This week, Twitter announced that it too is jumping on the ephemeral content bandwagon by releasing the Fleets functionality — fleeting tweets or fleets that disappear after 24 hours.

It is rolling out across accounts, so if you don’t have it yet, hang on, you will soon. It looks much as you would expect, taking over the top of the feed.

Nonprofit folks (OK, folks in general) complain about anything new, especially changes to the user interface of apps they use frequently, and of course, this is no exception. The reaction from Gay Twitter is especially amusing (and a serious lesson in having the right people in the room when branding decisions like this are made).

So let’s review the feedback to this announcement so far. This calls for an assist from Schitt’s Creek.

This was pretty much my reaction:

The nonprofit commentary I have seen so far is best captured in this range of emotion:

To which, Twitter responds . . .

OK, here’s what Twitter actually said . . .

So, what should you do?

If you don’t already use Twitter regularly, I would ignore this for now. Build up your regular Twitter use first.

If you are working on your Story content in general, I would start with building up your game in Instagram and sharing that over to Facebook Stories and now Fleets.

Looooong term, you can see how Fleets shake out and see if creating a specific strategy for this channel makes sense. We may find that certain types of users or people who talk about certain types of things embrace Fleets more than others. If those people or topics are relevant to your mission, then diving in sooner will make more sense.

In the meantime . . .

Published On: November 19, 2020|Categories: Nonprofit Communications|

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