Last night’s episode of The Office, where Jim, Pam, and the other Dunder-Mifflin staff battled it out over how to spend the end-of-year budget surplus brought me back to my days working at both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and at a small nonprofit that relied primarily on foundation funding.

It really was true: if you didn’t spend everything in your budget and still have a wish list a mile long at the end of the year, they didn’t give you as much money the next year.

If you find yourself with a few hundred bucks left in your budget this year, I have a suggestion for you. Get the Annual All-Access Pass to Nonprofit Marketing Guide.com. (Those of you at foundations can buy them for your grantees, too. Call me and we’ll work it out). It’s $330, which is a 15% savings over the quarterly passes. You get full access to every live and recorded webinar we offer for 12 months, as well as unlimited access to our on-demand courses. If you take full advantage of the Pass, you’ll save $1,500 over registering for everything a la carte.

I’m still confirming dates and speakers, but look at some of the new topics that will be on the schedule, just between January and March (not to mention repeats of some of our most popular webinars on annual reports, online marketing, and more):

– How to Get Your Board to Friendraise and Fundraise

– How to Position Your Organization as an Expert Source

– Best Practices in Nonprofit Communications

– Creating Evangelists: How to Excite and Motivate Your Supporters

– Nonprofit Marketing with Next to No Budget

– How to Write a Good Elevator Pitch

– Getting Over the Fear of Fundraising – For You and Your Board!

– How to Write and Talk about Your Nonprofit’s Success Stories

You’ll have a whole year of nonprofit marketing training, with no travel required, paid for before 2009 even starts, giving you the real-world tips and advice you need to position your organization to shine, despite the gloomy economy.

Details about the Pass Here | Sign-Up for the Pass Here

Published On: December 5, 2008|Categories: Nonprofit Communications|

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